TaxonAid demonstration

ThumbnailTaxonAid is an online tool dedicated to the improvement of techniques in taxonomic identification. We think that an approach using high quality interactive movement-based resources and existing identification keys represents the best way to both maximise efficiency of identification and also to provide an engaging learning and teaching environment.

Winter trees: From AIDGAP test version to final book

Winter trees and the River Severn in flood.  Photo: Rich BurkmarThe accurate identification of specimens is an important part of many forms of biological fieldwork. Although popular groups, such as birds and butterflies, are well served with identification guides, other groups are relatively neglected. Back in the 1970s, the Field Studies Council initiated the AIDGAP project, to work towards producing identification materials for these negelected groups. In many cases, the difficulty lay in the absence of a simple and accurate key, and not in any insuperable taxonomic problems.

Invasive aliens and other bad language

Himalayan balsam (Impatiens glandulifera).  Photo: Charlie BellA growing amount of attention is being given to biodiversity loss resulting from the introduction of non-native species. Introduced species that do well, especially if they do so at the expense native flora or fauna, are frequently referred to as ‘invasive aliens’.

Some thoughts on DNA barcoding and biological recording

Wall (Lasiommata megera).  Photo: Rich BurkmarI recently took part in a really interesting email discussion with some other NFBR members (National Forum for Biological Recorders) prompted by the recent publication of a paper on metabarcoding. I think it's fair to say that many biological recorders are very cautious about the use of DNA barcoding as a tool for monitoring biodiversity. There is a perception that the development of DNA barcoding may threaten the traditional morphological identification skills of the biological recorder. I have a more optimistic outlook and the rest of this blog is derived from an email I contributed to the email discussion.

Pages

Subscribe to Tomorrow's Biodiversity RSS